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Philosophy as therapy: Kant in the emergency room

Why is it not self-evident that it is better to save five lives and let one die? What does a “fair” health system mean? Moral and political views on health with Kant as a starting point, in the third article of the series on the role of philosophy as a treatment for the irrationality that dominated public discourse during the pandemic.

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Philosophy as therapy: Selfish man, altruistic market

Why was the defense of the free market during the pandemic crisis considered unthinkable for many, while for some, a necessary condition for the protection of human freedom? How can individual egoism in a capitalist economy function as effective altruism for the benefit of humanity? Rand's positions and Singer's arguments in the second article of the series on philosophical discourse amid the global coronavirus crisis.

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Philosophy as therapy: The jungle and the calculator of pleasures

How did philosophy contribute to the treatment of irrationality that prevailed in public discourse during the days of the pandemic? Was the crisis a golden opportunity for an era of renewed communism, as Zizek imagined? What was the moral criterion of many Western countries that delayed the implementation of strict protective measures? Populism, capitalism and the various manifestations of utilitarianism, in the first article of the series on issues of philosophical discourse during the global crisis of COVID-19.

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Personal responsibility and the puppets

In this second phase of the pandemic, a protocol of small everyday behaviors that we will carefully observe is a huge contribution to keeping us all safe. But if we want to be responsible for our own actions, as moral agents acting in accordance with their duty, then we must do so by choice, not as puppets who behave the way someone else forces them to.

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Virus views: Every Crisis is an Opportunity

It is certain that this virus crisis, like all similar crises in the history of mankind, will soon be overcome and life will return to its normal pace. The important thing is to overcome it in the least painful way for all of us. And let us always bear in mind that every crisis is an opportunity.

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COVID-19 Crisis and Personal Responsibility

In managing a crisis like the current one, our actions have an impact on a network of relationships that includes us, our close family, our companions and friends, our professional circle, the local community and the state itself. Our responsibility to all of them means obligations, duties and ultimately particular decisions, actions and behavior.

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It's the freedom of speech, stupid!

On the occasion of the cancellation of Woody Allen's book publication by Hachette Publishing, some thoughts on free speech, censorship, and the totalitarianism of morality defenders.

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Six Easy Pieces of Political Philosophy

My aim here is to approach six “easy” pieces of political philosophy, as a structured introduction, considering that their simplification can help -if not anything more- “freshen up” our political thinking. The issues considered here relate to the notions of social contract, the contention between communitarianism and liberalism, the values of equality and freedom, as well as the assessment of the political situation in financial terms or in evaluative terms of conservation and progress.

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The concept of Kantian Perceptual Peace and the Convergence of Ethics and Politics

This paper presents the views about war and peace before and after Kant, and analyze critically, the Kantian essay "Perceptual Peace."

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An approach to the meaning of the term “physei” in the Aristotelian political theory - connections with the modern ecology

This essay is attempting to clarify the meaning of the word "physei" in Aristotelian political theory, and especially to interpret how it is used in “Politica” particularly in the passages referring to the nature of the city and the people. This thesis is opposite to the reading of Aristotle in the light of political naturalism, because the naturalistic approach does not reflect totally the spirit of Aristotle's political theory. 

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From Business Ethics to Forced “Fair Play”

Some thinkers are considering "business ethics" as "oxymoron" while others see it as an imperative to ensure the 'market' and the entrepreneurship. The dilemmas we examine in this essay, focuses on the responsibility of legal - artificial - entities such as companies, toward: [A] persons (employees, shareholders and consumers), [B] other artificial entities (organizations or systems as companies, society, state, etc.) and, [C] the natural environment.

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Business and Moral Responsibility

Following the recent global financial crisis, there was extensive debate on companies social and moral responsibility. In Kantian terms, to evaluate an act as moral, the person who is acting has to be free. The fact that a company has to adopt principles for a reason (for example: "to" build a social profile or 'to' gain a profit or "to" create an image or loyalty etc) cannot be considered as a free choice of moral principles. According to the Kantian theory, if a person choose his principles for empirical reasons, (in this case to yield some sort of profit) this choice cannot considered as moral choice because in fact this choice is non-free. 

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Corporate Social Responsibility: From Business Ethics to “Fair Play”

Businesses act and grow within a market system characterized by synergies and complementarity. In a complementary system, I cannot cause damage to someone, without harming myself as well, in the short or in the long term.

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Children and Philosophy

Can a child understand complex philosophical concepts? Why is it important for children to come into contact with rationality? How can they take their first steps into the magical world of ideas? Aristotle used to say that philosophy starts with questioning. Questions such as "why?", "who am I?", "what's to blame?", "why is this bad?" are very common and depending on the age of the children, they require serious answers.

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